ARISSat-1’s predecessor: SuitSat-1

With all the attention given to ARISSat-1, I was surprised that not many are talking about what started it all. SuitSat-1 was launched off the ISS in the same manner as ARISSat-1 on Febuary 3, 2006.  SuitSat-1 was aptly named for a Russian Orlan spacesuit that was to be discarded because it was unserviceable and excess cargo on the ISS. The innovative and industrious  Ham community decided that it would be such a waste to simply discard it when it could be made into, you guessed it, at Amateur Radio satellite!

Mix one part transmitter, one part space suit, a dash of antenna, and a little power and poof, SuitSat-1 was born. Ok, I am over simplifying it a bit but this recipe sparked the imagination of thousands of people.  Amateurs around the world was on the hunt for the very weak and elusive signal. With a transmitter power of 1/2 watt and a rate of rotation of about 5.2 s the fade was deep and difficult to copy.  Hams with high gain antennas were about the only ones able to copy the telemetry and SSTV images. SuitSat-1 was not designed for long term operations like the new ARISSat-1. When SuiSat-1’s battery went dead, that was it. Just a lonely quiet ride around the Earth. SuitSat-1’s orbit lasted 7 months, 3 days or 215 Days. The suit had a large surface area and my hopes are that ARRISat-1 will stay in orbit much longer than that. I haven’t seen any real predictions about how long it will stay in an usable orbit but I am sure there are some rocket scientists crunching the numbers.

To find out more about SuitSat-1 check these out:

AMSAT’s SuitSat page (Pre-deployment)

AJ3U’s blog (submissions of audio, SSTV images and reception reports)

Wikipedia Page

 

Google Video:

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Posted on August 8, 2011, in ARISSat-1, Satellites. Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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